How to 'Save the Ocean'?

How to 'Save the Ocean'?

reduce carbon footprint

Start by reducing your footprint... lets go back in time.

BACK IN TIME ELECTRIC CARS ✔️ 1832 

Around 1832, Robert Anderson develops the first crude electric vehicle, but it isn't until the 1870s or later that electric cars become practical. Pictured here is an electric vehicle built by an English inventor in 1884.Ferdinand Porsche, founder of the sports car company by the same name, developed an electric car called the P1 in 1898. Around the same time, he created the world's first hybrid electric car -- a vehicle that is powered by electricity and a gas engine. 

FAST FORWARD ✔️ 1912
Charles Kettering invents the first practical electric automobile starter. Kettering's invention makes gasoline-powered autos more alluring to consumers by eliminating the unwieldy hand crank starter and ultimately helps pave the way for the electric car's demise.

FIRST COMMERCIAL BOTTLED WATER ✔️ 1767

The first commercially distributed water in America was bottled and sold by Jackson's Spa in Boston in 1767. Early drinkers of bottled spa waters believed that the water at these mineral springs had therapeutic properties and that bathing in or drinking the water could help treat many common ailments.

FAST FORWARD FIRST PLASTIC BOTTLED BEVERAGES  ✔️ 1973 

Bottled water requires up to 2,000 times the energy used to produce tap water. Engineer Nathaniel Wyeth patented polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles in 1973. The first plastic bottles able to withstand the pressure of carbonated liquids, they were a much cheaper alternative to glass bottles.

FAST FORWARD FIRST DISCOVERED OCEAN GARBAGE PATCH ✔️ 1988

The existence of the Great Pacific garbage patch, the first to be discovered, was predicted in a 1988 paper published by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of the United States. The prediction was based on results obtained by several Alaska-based researchers between 1985 and 1988 that measured neustonic plastic in the North Pacific Ocean.

Research studying trash washed onto beaches in and around the Indian Ocean suggested that there would be plastics found in the water column in the Indian Ocean as well.

So to summarize it was the inconvenience of having to wind up and crank the engine out of mere convenience as is with so many things in this world that killed the electric car.

Then came the cheap packaging materials that where a convenience only for those who purchased them that is killing our oceans only 15 years after mass production of plastic beverage containers.

 

NOW LETS GET BUSY ON HOW YOU CAN HELP THE OCEAN 

 

TEACH YOUR CHILDREN CONSERVATION ✔️

 

DO YOU REALLY NEED A STRAW = DO YOU PREFER TO KILL ✔️

Refuse straws: It’s as simple as adding, “No straw, please” when requesting beverages at restaurants or cafes.

 

PARTICIPATE IN THE GREAT GLOBAL CLEANUP 2020  ✔️

Another exciting opportunity to spearhead the end of plastic pollution is Earth Day Network’s campaign The Great Global Cleanup. This event aims to be “The Largest Environmental Volunteer Event in History” as a celebration of citizen science and the strength of community. There are many existing cleanup events events already in the works. If there is no cleanup already organized in your area, you can register a cleanup of your own. 

 

TURN OFF THE HYDRO JUICE ✔️

Many household electronics, such as video game consoles, stereos, computers, and kitchen appliances, continue drawing power after they are switched off. The U.S. Department of Energy estimates that this “phantom” energy use accounts for 75% of the power consumed by electronics in the average home. Eliminate this extra energy use by unplugging your gadgets or using a power strip to safely and quickly cut power to electronics that are not in use.

 

NO DISPOSABLE CONTAINERS  ✔️

The trash we "throw away" doesn't disappear. Plastic bags, disposable food containers, snack wrappers, and other loose garbage can be washed into local waterways and eventually end up in the ocean where it poses a major hazard for marine life. Seabirds, turtles, seals, and other animals can mistake floating plastic for food or become tangled in it and die. So ditch the disposable lifestyle, and make a point to bring your own reusable shopping bags, beverage cups, and food containers. 

 

SAVE A PLANET FILL YOUR TIRES ✔️

Hitting the road? Grab a simple tire gauge and make sure your tires are properly inflated. You can trim your carbon footprint, reduce wear and tear on your vehicle, and save yourself some cash at the same time. In fact, the U.S. Department of Energy estimates that under-inflated tires waste about 1.2 billion gallons of gas per year in the U.S. Cutting back on fossil fuel consumption can help curb the effects of climate change and ocean acidification, which are altering ocean chemistry and disrupting marine wildlife on a global scale

 

IF YOU EAT SEAFOOD DON'T ASK DEMAND ✔️

When it comes to many of our once-favorite seafood's, there aren't always plenty more fish in the sea. In fact, some studies estimate that up to 90 percent of large predatory fish (those that eat other animals—and usually end up on our dinner plates) have disappeared since humans began heavy fishing. You can help turn the tide by demanding sustainable seafood at the supermarket and in your favorite restaurants.

 

BUY FROM ZERO CARBON CORPORATIONS ✔️

Though we can make a difference through our own habits, corporations obviously have a much bigger footprint. If you believe a company could be smarter about its packaging, make your voice heard. Write a letter, send a tweet, or hit them where it really hurts: Give your money to a more sustainable competitor.

 

KEEP THINGS CLEAN THE RIGHT WAY ✔️

Even if you don't live near the coast, water and anything else that goes down your drain can eventually end up in the ocean. You can help keep the ocean and other waterways healthy by picking your cleaning products carefully. Many household chores can be done with simple, non-toxic ingredients like vinegar, baking soda, or lemon juice.

 

SKIP THE BALLOON AND LANTERN RELEASES ✔️

It might seem like an innocent romantic wedding idea, or a cultural event, but releasing balloons or sky lanterns, including the ones labeled “biodegradable,” can travel thousands of miles until they eventually land on the ground or water in the form of litter. What’s worse: birds, animals and marine life mistake the debris for food which clogs the digestive system and leads to starvation.

Safe Alternatives: Blow bubbles, plant a tree or write a wish on flying wish paper, roll it up, light it and let it go. The latter leaves minimal ash without harming the environment.